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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While I'm asking stupid questions, I'm looking for load data for some 190 grain cast bullets I got from Hunter's Supply.

My preferred handgun powder is Titegroup, but all I can find is some 180 grain Nosler Partition loads. Generally in my experience lead rounds will handle more powder than jacketed rounds, so I would imagine that about 5 grains of Titegroup should be a good point of departure, but does anyone have a better idea?

Yes, I called the manufacturer and got the boilerplate "We don't have load data for that" sort of response. I don't blame them, but it's not helpful either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That would have to be one massively downloaded Whelen. The muzzle velocities typical of a .35 Whelen would tear that cast bullet up terribly. This is bullet is designed as a low speed handgun thumper, not a big rifle screamer.

Mind you, I have nothing against the Whelen cartridges, I would just use jacketed bullets. If I had one, which I don't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
190 grains isn't the biggest bullet I know of for .357 Magnum. It's just the biggest I could easily get my hands on. The biggest listed in the Lee reloading manual is 200 grains.

I don't know of any reason it would be a bullet for the Ruger specifically. Smith & Wesson have some beefy .357 Magnum revolvers, and some people still have the old Colt Python. As long as you're shooting it in something with a big enough groove and a tight enough twist to keep the bullet pointed the right way, I see no real reason why anything couldn't shoot it. I'm no Taurus expert, but I'm pretty sure they have a few which could handle it.

I got these bullets specifically for shooting bowling pins, and I hope to drive them to around 1000fps at least.

The typical bowling pin load is 230 grains of .45ACP moving at around 800 fps, which is 184000 grain-feet per second.
If I can get 1000fps off 190 grains, that's 190000 grain-feet per second, which is enough momentum to do a clean knockdown.
I used to have a load which would do it with 125 grains, but there was enough pressure in the cylinder that ejecting the cases was a pain, so I'm seeing what I can do with other weights.

If I can't do it, I guess I'll have to save up for a .44 Magnum or a .45 Colt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I can't say that the GP100 is the strongest .357 Magnum on the market, but it certainly is very strong.

I would imagine that the blackhawk, for instance, would probably be stronger (certainly the frame is up to handling some very punishing loads).

It's also tempting to consider a mare's leg in .357 Magnum, on the theory that the sealed breach would give just a little extra punch as well as mitigating forcing cone and top strap concerns.
 
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