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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While I'm asking stupid questions, I'm looking for load data for some 190 grain cast bullets I got from Hunter's Supply.

My preferred handgun powder is Titegroup, but all I can find is some 180 grain Nosler Partition loads. Generally in my experience lead rounds will handle more powder than jacketed rounds, so I would imagine that about 5 grains of Titegroup should be a good point of departure, but does anyone have a better idea?

Yes, I called the manufacturer and got the boilerplate "We don't have load data for that" sort of response. I don't blame them, but it's not helpful either.
 

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I wish I could help, but this is the first time I've ever heard of such. That sounds far more appropriate for the .35 Whelen cartridge than the .357 Magnum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That would have to be one massively downloaded Whelen. The muzzle velocities typical of a .35 Whelen would tear that cast bullet up terribly. This is bullet is designed as a low speed handgun thumper, not a big rifle screamer.

Mind you, I have nothing against the Whelen cartridges, I would just use jacketed bullets. If I had one, which I don't.
 

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Oh. Right. I've been out of the game for so long I forgot about that little issue.

So I'm guessing that these big 190s are meant for Ruger only loads? Something the NM Blackhawk will eat like candy?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
190 grains isn't the biggest bullet I know of for .357 Magnum. It's just the biggest I could easily get my hands on. The biggest listed in the Lee reloading manual is 200 grains.

I don't know of any reason it would be a bullet for the Ruger specifically. Smith & Wesson have some beefy .357 Magnum revolvers, and some people still have the old Colt Python. As long as you're shooting it in something with a big enough groove and a tight enough twist to keep the bullet pointed the right way, I see no real reason why anything couldn't shoot it. I'm no Taurus expert, but I'm pretty sure they have a few which could handle it.

I got these bullets specifically for shooting bowling pins, and I hope to drive them to around 1000fps at least.

The typical bowling pin load is 230 grains of .45ACP moving at around 800 fps, which is 184000 grain-feet per second.
If I can get 1000fps off 190 grains, that's 190000 grain-feet per second, which is enough momentum to do a clean knockdown.
I used to have a load which would do it with 125 grains, but there was enough pressure in the cylinder that ejecting the cases was a pain, so I'm seeing what I can do with other weights.

If I can't do it, I guess I'll have to save up for a .44 Magnum or a .45 Colt.
 

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applesmasher said:
I don't know of any reason it would be a bullet for the Ruger specifically. Smith & Wesson have some beefy .357 Magnum revolvers, and some people still have the old Colt Python. As long as you're shooting it in something with a big enough groove and a tight enough twist to keep the bullet pointed the right way, I see no real reason why anything couldn't shoot it. I'm no Taurus expert, but I'm pretty sure they have a few which could handle it.
Reading up on the writings of Jeff Quinn over at Gunblast. Depending on the loads used, some .357 Magnum revolvers were more prone to having their forcing cones cracked, or flame cutting of the frame just above it. He also talked about how certain loads could actually stretch the frames on some guns if they were used excessively, or more quickly wear out the timing on the gun.

Granted this was discussed more with the older K-frame revolvers made to take the .357 Magnum, but he also talked about the Colt Python not being up to heavier loads with heavy bullets, as it could effect the mechanical condition of the Python, and more quickly wear it out due to its tighter factory tolerances.

I don't know how much of this is actual fact, how much is anecdotal, and how much is just musings. But like I said, I've been out of the game for a while. I'm still trying to get back into the full and proper swing of things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I can't say that the GP100 is the strongest .357 Magnum on the market, but it certainly is very strong.

I would imagine that the blackhawk, for instance, would probably be stronger (certainly the frame is up to handling some very punishing loads).

It's also tempting to consider a mare's leg in .357 Magnum, on the theory that the sealed breach would give just a little extra punch as well as mitigating forcing cone and top strap concerns.
 

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The 190, IIRC, has never been a big favorite in any .357 usage. It's a great deer cartridge, because it will penetrate very deeply, but there just isn't enough room.

I think that you can probably get 1k fps, if you find the right load. The only problem is that although the have the same general range of energy, the energy is measured in kinetic energy, and biased towards velocity. You may find that it doesn't perform as well at knocking down pins as the heavier and larger .45.

Good luck, love to hear how it turns out.
 
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