Educational Zone #135 – The Remington 700 XCR Tactical Long Range Rifle

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My old buddy Ted (who I call Chief, as he is a retired Chief Petty Officer from the US Navy Nuke Subs) just bought a new rifle.

It is a Remington 700 XCR Tactical Long Range Rifle in .308.

He has been wanting a super accurate .308 and this one looks like it might fit the bill.

Here it is:

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The rifle has a Bell & Carlson stock that comes in OD green with black webbing and features a full-length aluminum bedding block.

It also has a tactical beaver-tail fore-end and a recessed thumb-hook feature for optimum “off the bench” shooting performance.

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The barrel is a 26″ varmint-contour, 416 stainless steel barreled action with Black TriNyte PVD coating. It is a very tough coating.

The barrel also has wide tactical-style barrel fluting to reduce weight and provide quicker cooling. The crown is recessed.

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The recoil pad is an R-3 Pad, also called a Limb Saver.

It is thick and soft and really helps absorb the recoil.

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However, we did notice that the thick pad made the length of pull to be slightly over 14 inches.

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For the first trip to the range we had installed a Burris 8 X 32 X 40 scope.

This scope had a great, clear view, but we found that it did not have enough adjustment to bring the group up to where we wanted it.

So, we headed back to my house and installed another scope that Ted had.

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While we were there, I gave the rifle some TLC and cleaned the barrel up for the second trip to the range.

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Just a little cleaning and it was clean and ready to go.

The bore was smooth to clean and cleaned up fast and easy.

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After installing the second scope we headed back to the range.

This scope is a Burris 3.5 X 10 X 50.

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It is also a fine scope, but doesn’t have as much magnification as we would like.

But it was what we had and we wanted to see how well the rifle shot.

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The rifle is marked as a Remington 700 Tactical on the action.

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The barrel is marked as .308 Win 1 in 12” Twist.

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The bolt is jeweled, just like on my Remington 700 VLS, but it has been blued dark, I suppose with keeping with the “tactical” rifle mode.

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Here I am on the rifle.

It has a wonderfully smooth and crisp 40-X externally adjustable trigger.

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We set the target at 50 yards to be sure we were on the paper and shot a few rounds to get the scope dialed in.

Then Ted shot this group of three shots.

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And I shot this group of three shots.

Looks like it is ready to go.

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We moved the target to 100 Yards and shot some groups.

Here’s the Chief on the rifle.

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And here are a couple of representative 100 yard groups.

They are between ½ and ¾ inch, but we felt that this was partly because of the 10 power scope.

We both shoot better with more magnification and Ted believes he will get a variable scope with up to 20X magnification to put on the rifle.

I believe we can shrink those groups with a better scope and handloads.

The MSRP is $1510, and Ted paid $1178 for his.

Conclusions:
All in all, we were impressed with the accuracy of the rifle. It seems to be a very accurate and enjoyable rifle to shoot. 

1 Comment on Educational Zone #135 – The Remington 700 XCR Tactical Long Range Rifle

  1. I have this model rifle in 300 Win Mag and the accuracy is spot on, just like with your 308. The current scope is a Bausch and Lomb 10x Tactical, the same scope used on certain military sniper rifles in the 90s.
    All this begs the question…………if you can get a rifle to shoot consistent 1/2 MOA for a street price of roughly $1200 then why will people spend 4x that (or more) for a rifle that does the same and looks similar??!! That is, composite stock, similar trigger quality, etc. The only thing I can figure is bragging rights at the range much like spending 6 figures on a car to go from point A to point B.
    Personally I’d rather spend the $1200 just to be able to blame the rifle for a poor shot on my part. Hard to do with a $5000 rifle!!

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